News: Best in Class Award

We were so surprised and happy to learn that Citizens Cider won a Best in Class award in the Heritage Dry category at the Great Lakes International Cider and Perry Competition, which is the world's largest cider-judging. This was beyond our craziest dreams. Thank you so much to the apple-picking locals of Uxbridge and beyond! The quality, diversity, and varieties of apples you picked had everything to do with this win. The award-winning Citizens Cider was from apples picked and pressed in 2019.

Citizens Cider 2021 is now on our shelves.

Apple drop-offs start Sept 15. See below for instructions.

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What is the Citizen's Cider Project?

Our Citizen’s Cider Project turns previously neglected apples from local backyards, roadsides, fencerows, and abandoned fields into hard cider. Locals pick the apples and sell them to us. We press the apples to make a truly local, community cider.

Will we be doing the project again in 2022?

Yes - we wouldn't miss it! Apple drop-offs will start September 15, 2022.

How Does it Work? 

Bring your unsprayed apples to us and we will pay you $10 for a full bushel or approximately $0.25 per pound. Hint: a bushel and a half works out to the same price as a bottle of our cider - trades are welcome! You can bring apples in any container and we will measure it for you.

When and Where Can We Drop Apples Off?

Drop your apples off at the Banjo Cidery: 614 Sandford Rd, Uxbridge anytime we are open (see hours). Sorry, but we don't accept apples outside of our regular hours.

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Apple-Picking Do's and Don'ts

The DON’T’s:

  • Rot can spoil the cider. Avoid apples with rot. If the apple feels soft and is deep red, break one open to check for rot inside.

  • Fallen apples are usually unfit because they have rot, don't store well, and/or have dirt on them.

  • No sprayed apples, please.

  • Avoid unripe apples and apples with broken skin.

 

The DO’s:

  • Apples can be slightly imperfect: blemishes, apple scab, nicks, small bruises are all okay.

  • All apple varieties are welcome. Heritage varieties and crab apples are our favourites. Pears and quince are good as along as they are quite firm and not overly ripe.

  • You can pick over several days as the tree ripens and store them away from sun, rain and critters.

20190920_100133.jpg

Apple-Picking Do's and Don'ts

The DON’T’s:

  • Rot can spoil the cider. Avoid apples with rot. If the apple feels soft and is deep red, break one open to check for rot inside.

  • Fallen apples are usually unfit because they have rot, don't store well, and/or have dirt on them.

  • No sprayed apples, please.

  • Avoid unripe apples and apples with broken skin.

 

The DO’s:

  • Apples can be slightly imperfect: blemishes, apple scab, nicks, small bruises are all okay.

  • All apple varieties are welcome. Heritage varieties and crab apples are our favourites. Pears and quince are good as along as they are quite firm and not overly ripe.

  • You can pick over several days as the tree ripens and store them away from sun, rain and critters.